air quality

With millions of motorists set to hit the road for the bank holiday weekend, drivers have been urged to close windows and turn off fans while in traffic jams to avoid breathing in dangerously high levels of air pollution.  Latest research from the University of Surrey has shown that simple adjustment to your car’s ventilation system while sitting in traffic jams can greatly affect your exposure to toxic fumes by up to 76%. 

 

Go outside and take a long, deep breath. Do your lungs feel suitably refreshed? If you’re in any one of a growing number of cities, the answer to that question may well be ‘no’. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), a staggering 98% of large cities (those with more than 100,000 inhabitants) in low- and middle-income countries do not meet minimum air quality guidelines. The situation is better in high-income countries, but still, less than half of cities are up to standard.

In this short newsletter you will read an overview of Sefira hearing at the European Parliament on the 19th of April and a report of the Final Conference held at the Committee of the Regions of Bruxelles on the 20th of April.


From the document you will be able to download all the presentation of the experts who attended the meetings and our infographics about the conflicts on air quality in Europe and the acceptability of policies by the citizens.

As air pollution is responsible for around 400,000 premature deaths in the EU yearly, Environment MEPs on Wednesday tightened up Commission plans and called for more ambitious national caps on emissions of six main pollutants, such as sulphur dioxide, particulate matter and nitrogen oxides in order to cut emissions by 70% across the EU and save €40bn in air pollution costs by 2030. MEPs also want to include emissions reduction ceilings on mercury, and a midpoint target for most caps of 2025.

Pages