cancer

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Our lifestyles determine how often we are exposed to cancer-causing chemicals, such as those in traffic emissions and cigarette smoke. A Swedish study reveals how exposure to these chemicals varies from person to person. Among its findings, the amount of time a person spends in traffic or refuelling their car significantly affects how much benzene and butadiene they could inhale.

 

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This paper provides an update for 2014 on the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and in particular coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, across the countries of Europe. Cardiovascular disease causes more deaths among Europeans than any other condition, and in many countries still causes more than twice as many deaths as cancer. There is clear evidence in most countries with available data that mortality and case-fatality rates from CHD and stroke have decreased substantially over the last 5–10 years but at differing rates.

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Air pollution is linked to increased risk of developing an irregular heartbeat and blood clots in the lung, research suggests.

The impact of air pollution on the risk of heart attack and stroke is less clear, say UK experts.

Analysis of data from England and Wales shows air pollution is particularly harmful in the elderly.

Further research is needed on pollution and cardiovascular health, says the British Heart Foundation.

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Het IARC staat voor International Agency for Research on Cancer, en is een research afdeling van de Wereldgezondheid organisatie.
Zij hebben juist een 'paper' gepubliceerd waarin ze luchtvervuiling én fijn stof uitroepen tot sterk kankerverwekkend, met verwijzing naar longkanker, maar ook naar blaaskanker.
Deze uitspraak is gebaseerd op het onderzoeken van honderden studies, waarin de gegevens bestudeerd werden van miljoenen mensen, worldwide.

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LONDON (Reuters) - The air we breathe is laced with cancer-causing substances and should now be classified as carcinogenic to humans, the World Health Organisation's (WHO) cancer agency said on Thursday.
 
The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) cited data indicating that in 2010, 223,000 deaths from lung cancer worldwide resulted from air pollution, and said there was also convincing evidence it increases the risk of bladder cancer.
 
The WHO is a Geneva-based agency of the United Nations focused on international public health matters.