Air pollution

WHO: Breathe Life – Clean Air, Healthy Future 

Launched by the World Health Organization and the Climate & Clean Air Coalition, Breathe Life is a global campaign to raise awareness of air pollution's impact on our health and our planet, and build a network of citizens, urban and national leaders, and health professionals to leverage change in our communities.

Air Pollution is an invisible killer. We may not always see it, but it causes 1 in 8 deaths. Good news? We have solutions that are proven to work. Together we can save lives.

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Different modelling approaches are used to design and assess air quality plans across Europe. This study assessed the strengths and weaknesses of these different approaches. The researchers conclude that a large variety of models is in use, without a preferred or standard model having emerged yet. They identify integrating local-scale and large-scale models and verifying models with measurements as the most important challenges.

 

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Up to 99 percent of Americans and Europeans live under artificially brightened skies, according to a new analysis.

 

Light pollution over Joshua Tree National Park in California. (Dan Duriscoe/NPS)

Where should you travel if you want killer views of the stars unblemished by artificial light?

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Outdoor air pollution has grown 8% globally in the past five years, with billions of people around the world now exposed to dangerous air, according to new data from more than 3,000 cities compiled by the World Health Organisation. Director Maira Neira says India and China need to make ‘massive efforts because the situation at the moment is really bad for the population’

 

 

 

12 MAY 2016 | GENEVA - More than 80% of people living in urban areas that monitor air pollution are exposed to air quality levels that exceed WHO limits. While all regions of the world are affected, populations in low-income cities are the most impacted.

According to the latest urban air quality database, 98% of cities in low- and middle income countries with more than 100 000 inhabitants do not meet WHO air quality guidelines. However, in high-income countries, that percentage decreases to 56%.

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